Queen's Speech - Letting Fees

More than six months after first suggesting the idea, the government has announced plans to ban fees to lettings agents in England. A new Tenants' Fees Bill was announced in the Queen's Speech, which will stop tenants having to pay money to agents. The fees are for taking references, getting credit checks, or investigating immigration status.

The average amount paid in fees is currently £223, according to government figures. The chancellor, Philip Hammond, previously said that 4.3m households pay such fees every year. However, the housing charity Shelter found that one in seven renters pays more than £500, and tenants in London have complained about fees of up to £2,000.

When the bill becomes law, landlords will have to find the money to pay for such fees themselves. ARLA Propertymark said that as a result landlords would lose £300m, and would be likely to increase rents.

"A ban on letting agent fees will cost the sector jobs, make buy-to-let investment even less attractive, and ultimately result in the costs being passed on to tenants," said David Cox, the organisation's chief executive.

The new bill will also allow tenants to recover any fees that have been charged unlawfully.

In addition the government said it will make the process more transparent, as renters are currently charged varying amounts although, lettings agents in England and Wales are already required to publicise their rates.

If you have a housing problem you wish to discuss, please contact Claire on 02392 820747.

 

June 2017

Change in Law for Rental Property

A new Act will come into force on 20th March 2019 which states that any property let by a landlord as a home must be fit for living in. This includes private renting, social housing and houses of multiple occupancy (HMO).

More Info

New service for identifying charitable bequests

Senior Probate Executive, Alanna White, comments on a new system alerting charities to when they have been left money in wills is to be established by HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) following a decision to end its current arrangement.

More Info

Do you need to insure your car if you don’t drive it?

Partner, Hannah Jones, considers the implications of a recent ruling from the European court of Justice, which was asked “Do you need to insure a car that is kept secured off-road and which you have no intention of using?”

More Info

Uber drivers entitled to workplace protections

The ‘gig’ economy is characterised by the prevalence of short-term contracts or freelance work, as opposed to permanent jobs. It is either a positive working environment that offers a great deal of flexibility. 

More Info

Reviews

We’re proud to be associated with

  • The Law Society, Conveyancing Quality Accredited logo
  • The Law Society, Children Law Accredited logo
  • The Law Society, Criminal Litigation Accredited logo
  • The Law Society, Family Law Accredited logo
  • The Law Society, Family Law Advanced Accredited logo
  • The Law Society, Lexcel Accredited logo
  • Solicitors For The Elderly Accredited logo
  • Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners logo
  • Dementia Friends logo
  • Resolution logo